The Modernist Reformation & the Price of Heresy in Muslim Societies

Syrian philosopher and intellectual, Sadiq J. Al-Azm, (left) is seen here giving a lecture at the Käte Hamburger Center for Advanced Study in the Humanities, July 3, 2012.
Syrian philosopher and intellectual, Sadiq J. Al-Azm, (left) is seen here giving a lecture at the Käte Hamburger Center for Advanced Study in the Humanities, July 3, 2012.

Why only a handful of Muslims seem willing to speak out in a clear and unapologetic manner against extremism, for reform of their faith, and in defense of the right to free speech and expression of figures deemed controversial on account of some of their intellectual output or public views?

Continue reading “The Modernist Reformation & the Price of Heresy in Muslim Societies”

From glasnost to the Arab Spring

American Enterprise Institute – From glasnost to the Arab Spring: the moral foundation of anti-authoritarian revolutions.

Ammar Abdulhamid: Death But Not Humiliation 

http://c.brightcove.com/services/viewer/federated_f9?isVid=1&isUI=1

Continue reading “From glasnost to the Arab Spring”

Syria’s Democracy Activist on Moving Toward Peaceful Revolutions

By Anna Skibinsky, Epoch Times Staff

WASHINGTON—Ammar Abdulhamid’s views on modernizing Syria sound more like revolutionary solutions for most of the Arab world. Not surprisingly then, the activist, democracy spokesperson, and scholar hasn’t been allowed in his home country of Syria since 2005. Continue reading “Syria’s Democracy Activist on Moving Toward Peaceful Revolutions”

Change is in the Air!

First posted on my short-lived blog Tharwalizations. 

If the region spirals into warfare again, there will be enough blame to go around of course. But someone in the region should bear in mind that, following the collapse of the Soviet Union, the region did have 15 years to reinvent itself in accordance with the new realities all around it, but failed to do so. Stability and constancy are not values always to be cherished, and change no matter how onerous a task it might pose is not an existential threat. It becomes so when people try to avoid it at all costs, just as the peoples and government of the region did. But change is coming nonetheless, and violence will play a role in it, regardless of our best intentions. We are better off planning to manage it rather than resist in that nihilistic fashion to which many of our leaders seem accustomed.